13 PDF Article

Blood of Brothers has ratings and 56 reviews. Frank said: I’ve spent three and a half months in Nicaragua over the past two winters studying Spanish. By the former New York Times Managua bureau chief, this is a well-written, information-rich survey of modern Nicaragua. Kinzer describes how Cesar Sandino’s. Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua is a book by Stephen Kinzer, an American author and New York Times foreign correspondent who reported.

Author: Shakarg Taulkree
Country: Uzbekistan
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Health and Food
Published (Last): 25 June 2006
Pages: 429
PDF File Size: 12.21 Mb
ePub File Size: 4.8 Mb
ISBN: 438-3-20076-520-1
Downloads: 1864
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Kajora

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again.

Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Blood of Brothers by Stephen Kinzer.

This is Stephen Kinzer’s dramatic story of the centuries-old glood struggle that burst into the headlines in with the overthrow of the Somoza dictatorship. It is a portrait of the Nicaraguan people and their volcanic land, brothrs cultural history rich in poetry and bloodshed, baseball and kinzee.

Paperbackpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Blood of Brothersplease sign up. Lists with This Book. I’ve spent three and a half months in Nicaragua over the past two winters studying Spanish, volunteering and travelling.

The country is beautiful, the people warm and welcoming. This is a must read for anyone interested in Nicaragua. It tells the story of the overthrow of the Somosa regime realized in the summer of and of the contra war in the eighties during which the Regan regime funded the contra rebels and did everything short of mounting a full invasion of the country to dislodge the c I’ve spent three and a half months in Nicaragua over the past two winters studying Spanish, volunteering and travelling.

It tells the story of the overthrow of the Somosa regime realized in the summer of and of kinzfr contra war in the eighties during which the Regan lf funded the contra rebels and did everything short of mounting a full invasion of the country to dislodge the communist Sandinistas headed by Daniel Ortega.

Blood of Brothers : Life and War in Nicaragua

Kinzer presents a balanced picture of the contra war. The Sandinastas did a lot of stupid things, the contras has some legitimate grievances. There were atrocities on both sides. He saves his more savage critisism for the Regan administration, the CIA and the state department.

In their myopic vision of fighting the evil empire of world communism they misled the American people as od what was going on in Nicaragua and caused the unnessary deaths of thousands of young Nicaraguans on both sides of the civil war. Dec 13, Justin rated it it was amazing. When I was in Nicaragua this book was like Girl Scout cookies brotherrs January – everybody wanted it but nobody could find it. It was out of print.

You heard rumors about this brotgers book. Everybody knew somebody that had read it and raved about it, but nobody knew where to get a copy.

Blood of Brothers : Stephen Kinzer :

When I finally got a copy Fedex’d in from America the book exceeded my wildest expectations. We didn’t When I was in Nicaragua this book was like Girl Scout cookies in January – everybody wanted it but nobody could find it. We didn’t get the guy’s name, but we were convinced that it was Stephen Kinzer. We were super excited because this was the man himself, the guy that had guided our cultural literacy to the ways of Nicaragua.

The guy that had written the greatest book ever written about Nicaragua. Years later I actually met Stephen Bloox at a speaking engagement at Politics and Prose after he did a reading of his book Overthrow. Not the same guy. But our excitement sums up my feelings on Blood of Brothers. May 27, Carol rated it it was amazing. This is a must read kunzer anyone interested in the gorgeous country of Nicaragua.

  KATHERINE PATERSON UN PUENTE HACIA TERABITHIA PDF

broters I lived in Nicaragua for nine months, am dating a “Nica”, and have been back for visits three times. It is a beautiful, poor country it’s the poorest country in Latin America with a laid back atmosphere and warm people.

I set out to read about its turbulent history that led it to its present state and this was the perfect find. Kinzer was the The New York Times bureau chief, reporting on the fall of the Somoza dynas This is a must read for anyone interested in the gorgeous country of Nicaragua. Kinzer was the The New York Times bureau chief, reporting on the fall of the Somoza dynasty in which led to brotners decade of Sandinista rule and civil war. It’s a sad, sad history full of corruption and violence as the Sandinistas, the contras, and the Reagan-led U.

As always, the poor country folk and young people were the ones who ultimately paid the price. I thoroughly enjoyed how Kinzer interwove Nicaragua’s history with bloood personal experiences with the beauty of the country, its culture, and its people.

Although it tops pages, there were very few lulls as I often gawked at some of the unbelievable things that happened in Nicaragua. It’s definitely stranger than fiction. Jul 14, John rated it really liked it Shelves: For most of the s bloody wars were being fought in three Central American countries, all of them involving the United States. In Brothets Salvador and Guatemala, guerrilla armies were attempting to overthrow beothers dictatorships – the dictatorships, supported by the US, had ruled those countries for bloood.

In Nicaragua, the reverse was happening: In the three wars, somedied and many more were maimed or forced to leave their homes. He was well-informed about pre-revolutionary conditions, and the excesses and barbarity of the Somoza dictatorship. He was also well-placed to become the local correspondent for the New York Times, kiinzer is what he was from onwards.

On the surface, the three Central American wars had as neutral bystanders both Honduras and Costa Rica the other nations of the original five that made up the region. In practice, as US allies, they were inextricably drawn in.

Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua by Stephen Kinzer

Both were used as the sites of kinezr bases for the Contra forces, and both were used to channel arms and money coming from the United States. Kinzer became the first journalist to expose this connection, when in March he and a photographer tracked down a Contra camp near the Nicaraguan bbrothers of Honduras and were even able to see Knizer weaponry.

Kinzer also recorded the mistakes being brotherz by the inexperienced Sandinista government, though to bloid mind he gives insufficient emphasis to the extreme difficulties they faced in fighting both a war and an economic blockade, in a country that had been pillaged by Somoza and then deserted by a good proportion of its businessmen and skilled professionals, who fled to Miami and points north.

His ambassador made it clear to the Sandinistas that they would now face the full might of the Contras. Kinzer chronicles the disastrous war which inevitably failed to defeat the Sandinistas militarily but was a major factor in their eventual electoral defeat, inby which bblood a majority of the population were simply fed up with conscription, young people dying in the mountains, and the hardships of a barely functioning economy.

He describes two particular incidents very well. Hasenfus instantly talked about how his missions were organised, revealing how the CIA were circumventing Congressional bans on providing the Contra with weapons and supplies.

Both events exposed the reality of the Contra war and its destructive aims, and helped the push towards the eventual peace process which Kinzer also describes. Stephen Kinzer makes many observations which chime with my own experiences of living in Nicaragua for 12 years.

Blood of Brothers

One which particularly caught my attention is his comment about how quickly, once peace was agreed, the former combatants were talking to each other and behaving almost as if the war had never happened. There have been problems, of course, including small groups who for years never gave up their weapons. But, in contrast to many other war-torn countries, it is remarkable how quickly Nicaragua became a peaceful place to live and how soon people who had been mortal enemies were reconciled and even became friends.

  FICCIONARIO ALTUNA PDF

Aug 11, Michael Griswold rated it really liked it. Stephen Kinzer writes an engaging although sad and depressing narrative about Nicaragua during the U. Drawing on interviews with government officials and local residents Kinzer paints a picture of a country in an unsettled state of war. Nicaraguans buried a whole generation of their young fighting to first remove the Somoza dictatorship from power and then a second civil war between the Sandinistas and the Con Stephen Kinzer writes an engaging although sad and depressing narrative about Nicaragua during the U.

Nicaraguans buried a whole generation of their young fighting to first remove the Somoza dictatorship from power and then a second civil war between the Sandinistas and the Contras. Kinzer also discusses the impact of the Sandinista and Samoza policies on the people of Nicaragua and why Nicaragua continues to be a place of intrigue.

Dec 11, Nick rated it liked it. Riveting yet terribly sad page history of Nicaragua’s struggle for peace from Somoza to the Sandinistas. Kinzer’s first-person reporting places you in the unrest of Managua and fighting in the foothills. Reagan’s gambit to outspend the communists worked in the end, but created conflict far beyond Russia and Eastern Europe, with 30, lives lost in Nicaragua.

Dec 31, Athalia rated it it was amazing. Excellent book about the Contra War in Nicaragua, good detail really brings to life the conflict and all its actors providing great insights. Dec 28, Anne rated it it was amazing Shelves: I was supposed to visit Nicaragua this past summer, but right before my trip, massive and violent civil unrest broke out, and it continues today. My tour company canceled, but he recommended this book as the most balanced perspective on their history.

But also because I approach these kinds of books with a side eye: Will it go too easy on Reagan? Will I was supposed to visit Nicaragua this past summer, but right before my trip, massive and violent civil unrest broke out, and it continues today.

Will it worship the Sandinistas as saints? Will it address the true nuance in the motivations of both Sandinistas and contras? This book is indeed very balanced: Kinzer is a true journalist, an open minded, open hearted, inquisitive listener and questioner.

He dives to the heart of motivations to make you feel situated in understanding a conflict that previously felt too complex and daunting, too riddled with propaganda on both sides to make sense of. This book makes me feel like I have a strong foundation of knowledge now.

Following his life and his journalist adventures make it part history book, part memoir. But this book made me see that a lot of mistakes were made, a lot of freedoms repressed, but it also was clear eyed about the awful Reagan policies that cost many lives.

Essential reading for anyone interested in this history or the Cold War. Aug 06, Matt rated it it was amazing. Politics are written with the blood of a nation, and nowhere is that more evident than in a country of great upheaval like Nicaragua during the 80s and the revolution-era, where starvation, poverty and regular burials at the cemetery were a way of life.